About Us

      The Nigerwives Association also assists in tackling most of the immigration problems that the foreign wives may have through its Central Council and the Abuja Liaison officer appointed by the Central Council. “Immigration formalities pose problems to the young Nigerwife who is coming to Nigeria for the first time. Even now that the regulations have changed, they find it difficult to get access in their various states. Most of the times they need to come to Abuja to regularise their documents.

       Another aim of our Association is to establish or assist in social projects that benefit the communities we live in here in Nigeria. One of such projects is the Braille Book Production Centre in Lagos, which produces Braille Books for Blind children and distributes them all over the Federation.

Towards our sisters we function as an extended family in Nigeria by sharing in their joys and sorrows. We attend ceremonies such as Naming ceremonies, traditional ceremonies, graduations, weddings, birthdays, funerals etc. Wherever a Nigerwives comes from, whatever her age, profession, economic background she is always welcomed and cared for.

         We extend this hospitality to all our new members who might be joining us in later times.The Nigerwives Nigeria is the Association of foreign women married to Nigerians.The association started with a group of foreign women married to Nigerians in Lagos and as the association evolved, branches started springing up in other parts of the country, to the final result which is a nationwide association. began in 1979 but became a legal entity with a constitution and its formal registration in 1987.

         The association has branches in numerous states of the country including Abuja, Abeokuta, Abia, Akwa Ibom, Calabar, Enugu, Ibadan, Kaduna, Lagos, Ondo, Owerri, Port Harcourt, Warri etc. 

         The primary aim of Nigeriwives Association is to assist the integration of foreign wives into the Nigerian society. When it comes to matters of life, love and death, society still expects that women should stand by their husbands. Any woman married to an African man often deals with the added expectation that they are to give succour in times of crisis, be a sounding board for extended family issues, and generally understand what the African family is all about. For the foreign wife whose background was not centred on this context, this, amongst other traits may prove daunting. They may quickly learn that despite the exposure to western culture, their husbands to a large extent, still reflect that traditional Nigerian, who is at the core, a mirror of their ancestors.

NATIONAL CHARITY PROJECT